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How can you keep your divorce amicable?

On Behalf of | Dec 6, 2019 | Divorce |

Couples in Colorado sometimes come to the joint conclusion that divorce is their best option. After deciding on divorce, you do not have to resign yourself to a long legal battle.

There are many ways you can make a divorce more peaceful. At the very least, you can remove some sources of friction to lower the chances of arguments occurring.

Go into the divorce without blame

Even though you may believe you are in the right, it will not help your negotiations if you point this out to your spouse. Instead, focus only on the task at hand, which is the business of divorce.

Work out settlements with an air of dignity and mutual respect. Treating each other’s emotions with care is important to maintaining peace.

Try to keep your eye on the big picture

What will your life look like after the process is complete? Divorce is about ending a relationship, but it is also about planning for the future. Before the negotiations begin, make a list of what you need and a second list of what you are willing to give up in order to get what you need. Be realistic about what your spouse may need.

Focus on your children

Try not to linger on negative feelings toward each other. Instead, keep your child at the forefront of your mind. Is your parenting plan good enough for them? Are you going to be capable of co-parenting well?

Consider mediation

Perhaps you and your spouse need some help managing your discussion. A neutral third party working as a mediator may be able to provide you with the dispute resolution tactics to overcome the arguments. This person does not make decisions for you, but he or she can sit down with the two of you and your attorneys to help you to discuss reasonable solutions.

If you and your spouse are unable to sit down together at all, the mediator may act as a go-between, meeting with you and your spouse separately.

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