Yes, Pearman Law Firm is open! We have a full staff working remotely (and at the office as necessary) to ensure your legal needs are well taken care of during these difficult times. We offer telephone consultations and virtual meetings, and can provide for all your legal representation remotely when necessary and possible. We are doing Last Wills and Estate Planning as well.
 
If you need legal help, do not hesitate to call us at 303-991-7600 or contact us using our online contact form.

How can you talk to your children about divorce?

| Feb 25, 2021 | Divorce |

Speaking to your children about your upcoming divorce may seem like an impossible task at first.

However, remembering to keep the conversation polite and giving your children lot of reassurance throughout the entire process can help you deal with the stress of this discussion.

Be direct and straightforward

According to Psychology Today, many young children often feel confused when first hearing about their parents’ decision to divorce. Some may blame themselves or start to worry about whether or not their parents still love them.

No matter how your children react, make sure to keep your responses simple and factual. Do not talk about disagreements or arguments you had with your spouse that led up to this decision. Keeping the conversation age-appropriate is extremely important.

Allow them to ask questions

It is likely that your children will have inquiries about what comes next after your divorce. Instead of finishing the conversation quickly, take time and answer any questions or concerns they bring up.

As your children process this change, you may find they express their emotions more intensely and in different ways. Be patient as they come to terms with this big life change.

Reassure them you love them

Divorce can cause children to feel or scared, but spending extra time with them lets them to realize you will stay a constant in their lives. Planning fun activities to do together or even giving them more hugs can help soothe their worries.

Being consistent in discipline and rules can also help them realize you are just as steady and present now as you were before. This kind of reassurance will help children feel more comfortable discussing divorce.

FindLaw Network